Toronto Piano Tuning

by Jamie Musselwhite

Toronto Piano Tuning

by James Musselwhite

Buyer Beware

I have to say this far too often: "Don't judge a piano by how it looks." Looks, as they say, aren't everything.

I recently had the misfortune to run across this 1890's Heintzman ex-player Grand.

Looks nice, right?

Its pretty exterior hides an ugly truth: Some people in the piano business are evil - either because they are greedy, or because they are incredibly ignorant. Either way, It's my number one aggravation. (My number two is leaf-blowers.)

Hear's the clues to the facts:

1. Wrong decal. The right decal is easily obtained from a piano parts supplier.

2. New keytops improperly installed. If they were installed correctly, the key body would have been cleaned first, the old celluloid front removed, the new plastic glued on using the right glue, and the new top shaped to match the size of the key, including the fronts.

To quote The Donald: "Wrong!"

To quote The Donald: "Wrong!"

Again: "Wrong!" GLUE DOESN'T STICK TO DIRT!!!!

Again: "Wrong!" GLUE DOESN'T STICK TO DIRT!!!!

This was a new one - who ties a loop like this?

It's actually causing the string to lose bearing on the bridge because the added height over the bass duplex bar.

It's actually causing the string to lose bearing on the bridge because the added height over the bass duplex bar.

It should look like this:

Finally, New hammers had been glued onto the old shanks, without the action being cleaned or otherwise serviced. In fact most of the parts were seized. The hammers that are sticking up into the air are ones so badly seized, the notes do not even play.

So, the moral of the story is: Call me BEFORE you buy a used piano!